Teaching

In Fall 2017, I began re-designing my courses across the curriculum to incorporate research-based learning and digital humanities methods. As I tell my students: “there’s method in it, Hamlet!” That is to say, I’m reversing conventional sequences of primary source-then-research in order to offer students critical frameworks from which they may receive and digest primary source material. I am also teaching students how to create and manipulate textual corpora so that they may visualize shared points of contact between texts – and in their own essay writing. The semester’s in full-swing, so apologies for brevity here!

Spring 2018

LC347, A Rogue’s Progress: Mapping Kit Marlowe’s Social Networks (Stonehill College, Sp18 ):

This project-based Learning Community synthesizes conventional English studies with machine-assisted reading and research practices to introduce students to text-based Digital Humanities practices. Students will study the adventures and legacy of early modern London’s most notorious poet, playwright, likely spy, and general roustabout, Christopher (aka “Kit”) Marlowe. In Unit 1, students will build on the work of their predecessors by conducting scholarly research and contribute descriptive links to The Christopher Marlowe Project (CMP) website; students will also cross-check and add information to the “ographies” (persons/places/titles) that complement works in the “Mini Archive.” In Unit 2, students will first read Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus in the context of his social networks and the play’s intertexts (and there’s some neat cross-over there!), and then conduct research that will help them edit and augment the “Works” pages of the website. In the final unit, students will use Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) guidelines as they transcribe, encode, edit and publish two mixed-genre, seventeenth-century editions of Doctor Faustus on the “Mini-Archive” page of the CMP site.

ENG 100, Literary Evolutions (Stonehill College, Sp18):

Etymologically (at the word’s root), literature is associated with “humane learning” and “literary culture” (see OED). Our primary goal in this course is to recognize the interdependence of literary evolution and human culture. We will explore how literature evolves over time and across discourses, including poetry, prose, drama, music, film, the graphic novel, and television. Close readings of core texts and their offshoots will offer insight into the concepts of adaptation and intertextuality, plus into how socio-political context informs art. Additionally, each unit requires students to engage in exploratory research, to develop researchable questions, and to generate annotated bibliographies for our class Lib Guide. The goal of our research sessions is to independently generate and pursue critical research questions in a supportive learning environment.

ENGL 2200, Introduction to Western Cultural Movements (Wentworth Institute of Technology, Sp18)

In this course, a sequel to English 1100, students will continue to develop their writing, research, critical analysis, and information literacy skills, with a focus on crafting writing assignments that incorporate multiple primary and secondary sources. Course activities will emphasize continued practice in planning, drafting, and revising writing through completion of multiple drafts of essays and digital writing. The course will incorporate one full research paper. As a springboard to writing, students will study four specific cultural movements, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Modernism and Postmodernism, and explore these movements through the critical reading of a range of texts, including fiction, poetry, drama, philosophy, political theory, history, aesthetic criticism, and the personal essay (Dept. course description).

Fall 2017

LC347, A Rogue’s Progress: Mapping Kit Marlowe’s Social Networks (Stonehill College, F17):

In this project-based Learning Community, students will study the adventures and legacy of early modern London’s most notorious poet, playwright, likely spy, and general roustabout, Christopher (aka “Kit”) Marlowe. Throughout the course, students will use tools from the digital humanities as they research and develop an open-access website that fills existing gaps in Marlowe studies. CMPhomeimageStudents will create a critical bibliography of online Marlowe resources, build web exhibits, write encyclopedia entries about Marlowe’s known associates, plus transcribe, edit, and encode archival works that contribute to open-source Marlowe scholarship.

ENG 100, Literary Evolutions (Stonehill College, F17):

Etymologically (at the word’s root), literature is associated with “humane learning” and “literary culture” (see OED). Our primary goal in this course is to recognize the interdependence of literary evolution and human culture. We will explore how literature evolves over time and across discourses, including poetry, prose, drama, music, film, the graphic novel, and television. Close readings of core texts and their offshoots will offer insight into the concepts of adaptation and intertextuality, plus into how socio-political context informs art. Additionally, each unit requires students to engage in exploratory research, to develop researchable questions, and to generate annotated bibliographies for our class Lib Guide. The goal of our research sessions is to independently generate and pursue critical research questions in a supportive learning environment.

ENGL1100, Expository Writing (Wentworth Institute of Technology, F17):

Thematically, this course plays with the institution’s acronym “WIT,” and explores a range of its connotations including its capacities for invention, intelligence, knowledge, linguistic facility, humor, and satire. As class participants hone their wit through reading and participating in lively class discussions, each unit asks students to demonstrate their ability to think deeply about the evolution of human/e values in a series of informal and formal writing assignments.

 

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