Research

 

Edited Volumes

Editor and Introduction. Conversational Exchanges in Early Modern England (1549-1640). Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015.

Refereed Articles and Chapters

Co-author with Janelle Jenstad. “Collaborative Bibliodigigogy: Teaching Bibliography with Digital Methodologies and Pedagogical Partnerships” in Digital Pedagogy in Early Modern Studies: Method and Praxis, New Technologies in Renaissance Studies, Digital Pedagogies series, Iter Press in collaboration with the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (forthcoming 2020).

Co-author with Andrew Jeromski. ‘“The Glory of Our Sexe’: Elizabeth I and Early Modern Women Writers.” Women Writers in Context, Women Writers Online. Northeastern University, May 2020, wwp.northeastern.edu/context/#bennett.glory.xml.

“Telescoping Translation: ‘Hero and Leander,’ Lenten Stuffe, and Bartholomew Fair.Marlowe Studies: An Annual, vol. 6, 2016.

“Negotiating Authority through Conversation: Thomas Nashe and Richard Jones.” Conversational Exchanges in Early Modern England (1549-1640), Edited by Kristen Abbott Bennett, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, pp. 102-131.

“At the Crossroads: Intersections of Classical and Vernacular English Protest Literature in Pierce Penilesse.” Essay cluster: “Literature of Protest.” Upstart: A Journal of English Renaissance Studies, August 2015, upstart.sites.clemson.edu/Essays/protest/bennett_crossroads.xhtml.

Bridging the Gap between Digital and Material ‘Print’ Cultures in Early Modern Literary Studies.” This Rough Magic, A Peer-Reviewed, Academic, Online Journal Dedicated to the Teaching of Medieval and Renaissance Literature, December 2014, http://www.thisroughmagic.org/abbott%20bennett%20article%202.html.

“Red Herrings and the ‘Stench of Fish’: Subverting ‘Praise’ in Thomas Nashe’s Lenten Stuffe.Renaissance and Reformation/Renaissance et Réforme, vol. 37, no.1, 2014, pp. 87-110, jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/renref/article/view/21283,

‘“I moot speke as I kan’: The Squire’s Optimistic Attempt to Circumvent Rhetorical ‘Following’ in The Canterbury Tales.” This Rough Magic, A Peer-Reviewed, Academic, Online Journal Dedicated to the Teaching of Medieval and Renaissance Literature, December 2011, http://www.thisroughmagic.org/abbott%20bennett%20article.html.

Short Articles

 “The Preposterous Publication History of Elizabeth I’s ‘Golden Speech.’” “Intertextual Networks,” Women Writers Project, Northeastern University, May 21, 2019, wwp.northeastern.edu/blog/golden-speech/.

The Queen’s Two Corpora: Finding Elizabeth using the WWO Database.” Women Writers Project, Blog Posts, June 13, 2017, http://www.wwp.northeastern.edu/blog/finding-elizabeth/.

Online Pedagogy Publications

Co-authored with Hedda Monaghan, “About” (all blogs). Rams Write, libguides.framingham.edu/c.php?g=894986&p=6500115, 2019 – present.

“About” and “Teaching Resources” (all blogs and materials). The Kit Marlowe Project, www.kitmarlowe.org/about/, 2017 – present.

“The Four Points of Character Analysis.” The Folger Shakespeare API Tools, The Folger Shakespeare Library May 2019, www.folgerdigitaltexts.org/api.

Co-author with Janelle Jenstad. Pop Culture and ‘Bibliodigigogy’ in Early Modern England. “Syllabus”; “Stationers Assignment”; “EEBO Assignment.” Women Writers Online, Women Writers Project, “Early Modern Digital Pedagogies Workshop, 30 March 2016.” Northeastern University, wwp.northeastern.edu/outreach/seminars/emdp_2016-03/10.

 ‘“Watching the Detectives’: A field trip with undergraduates to the Boston Public Library Rare Book and MS Room.” The Shakespeare Standard. 14 March 2014, www.theshakespearestandard.com/watching-detectives-field-trip-boston-public-library-rare-book-ms-room/.

Monograph plans

Englishing Protest Literature: Vernacular Reformation from Chaucer to Shakespeare

The “bumper-sticker” version:

My interest in early modern women’s gestures toward “Englishing” early modern literature follow my long-time interest in how, from Chaucer to Shakespeare, early vernacular writings protest crises of rhetoric that analogize the socio-political crises characterizing England’s expanding empire. One of my driving questions is: does satire “work” as a mode of social reform?

 

 

 

 

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